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Why are LCS ships being decommissioned?

Why are LCS ships being decommissioned?

Modern Military

USS Freedom on sea trials in February 2013 before her first deployment
Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James R. Evans – http://www.navy.mil/view_image.asp?id=144322
Crop of 130222-N-DR144-174. The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) is underway conducting sea trials off the coast of Southern California. Freedom, the lead ship of the Freedom variant of LCS, is expected to deploy to Southeast Asia this spring.

After years of complaints from in and outside of the US Navy. Apparently the LCS ship program finds itself on the chopping block now!

“In 2024, it is planned that the Independence-class LCS USS Jackson (LCS 6) will be decommissioned after just nine years in service.”Was the US Navy’s Littoral Combat Ship a mistake?

All Freedom Littoral Combat Ships in Commission Tapped for Early Disposal!

The US Navy’s LCS (Littoral Combat Ship) program began in the early 2000s as a way to replace aging frigates and other ships that were nearing the end of their service lives. The LCS was intended to be a versatile, multi-mission ship capable of operating in shallow waters close to shore, where it could support a wide range of missions, including anti-piracy, counter-terrorism, and humanitarian relief operations. The program was also designed to be cost-effective, with a goal of producing a large number of ships at a reasonable price.

However, the LCS program has become plagued by a number of problems and failures, which have led many admirals to question its effectiveness and value. One of the main issues has been with the ships themselves, which have been criticized for their lack of armor and survivability. The LCS was designed to be a fast, agile ship, but this has come at the cost of protection, which has made the ships vulnerable to attack. In addition, the LCS has been plagued by mechanical and technical problems, including issues with its propulsion systems and electrical systems, which have resulted in costly delays and repairs.

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The U.S. trimaran USS Independence
U.S. Navy photo by Naval Air Crewman 2nd Class Nicholas Kontodiakos – This image was released by the United States Navy with the ID 100329-N-1481K-298 (next)

Another issue with the LCS program has been with its cost. The original plan was to produce a large number of ships at a cost of around $220 million each, but this target has proved to be unrealistic. The cost of the ships has ballooned to over $500 million each, which has led to a reduction in the number of ships that the Navy can afford to buy. This has also led to criticism from Congress and other stakeholders, who have questioned the value of the LCS program compared to other options.

In recent years, many admirals have called for the LCS program to be cancelled or scaled back, citing its many failings and high cost. Some have argued that the Navy would be better off investing in other types of ships, such as frigates or destroyers, that are more capable and survivable. Others have suggested that the Navy should look to unmanned systems, such as drones or unmanned surface vessels, as a way to fill the gap in its littoral combat capabilities.

Overall, the LCS program has been a controversial and troubled initiative for the US Navy. While the ships have some useful capabilities, their high cost and many failings have led many to question whether they are the best use of the Navy’s resources. Lastly, as the Navy looks to modernize its fleet and maintain its global presence, the future of the LCS program remains uncertain. But, likely over. However, Admirals change their minds! Take the Iowa Battleship program’s reactivation multiple times!

Can the Iowa-class battleships be reactivated?

Why are LCS ships being decommissioned?