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What Exactly Did Enron Do?

What Exactly Did Enron Do?

Business
The Simpsons – Enron’s ride of broken dreams

Enron Corporation was an American energy, commodities, and services company based in Houston, Texas. Founded in 1985 as the result of a merger between Houston Natural Gas and InterNorth, two natural gas pipeline companies. Under the leadership of CEO Kenneth Lay & eventually COO Jeffrey Skilling, Enron grew rapidly, becoming one of the largest companies in the United States.

In the 1990s, Enron began to diversify its business operations, moving into areas such as telecommunications and the internet. The company also began to engage in controversial accounting practices, which would ultimately lead to its downfall.

Enron’s financial problems came to light in 2001, when it became revealed that the company had overstated its profits and understated its debt. This led to a loss of investor confidence, and the company’s stock price plummeted. In December 2001, Enron filed for bankruptcy, making it one of the largest corporate failures in history.

The scandal surrounding Enron’s collapse led to a number of investigations and legal proceedings. Several Enron executives, including CEO Kenneth Lay, were convicted of fraud and other charges related to the company’s collapse.

Mug shot of Kenneth Lay.

The Enron scandal also led to increased scrutiny of corporate accounting practices and the passage of new laws and regulations aimed at preventing similar fraud in the future.

Enron’s collapse had a significant impact on the corporate world, leading to increased scrutiny of corporate accounting practices and the introduction of new laws and regulations aimed at preventing similar frauds in future.

But, what was the genesis of the fraud?

Many point to a combination of Jeff Skilling & Enron CFO Andrew Fastow. 

Skilling joined Enron in 1990 as a consultant and quickly rose through the ranks to become the company’s chief operating officer in 1997. Known for his aggressive and ambitious approach to business, he played a key role in expanding Enron’s operations into areas such as telecommunications and the internet.

Mug shot of Jeffrey Skilling.

But, Enron’s most profitable business from the ‘outside’ was the wholesale energy trading operations, managed by Lou Pai.

As CEO of Enron Energy Services (EES), a subsidiary of Enron that provided energy management services to commercial and industrial customers. He was also a member of Enron’s executive committee and had a significant influence on the company’s financial performance. EES became famous for changing their accounting practices to mark to market which inflated the revenue value of a deal, despite no actual change in profitability.

Between 1996 to 2000, Enron’s revenues increased by more than 750%, rising from $13.3 billion in 1996 to $100.8 billion in 2000. 

EES became created in the late 1990s as part of Enron’s strategy to diversify its business operations and move into new areas beyond its traditional focus on natural gas pipelines.

EES offered a wide range of services to its customers, including energy consulting, procurement, and risk management. The company also provided energy-efficient products and services, such as energy-efficient lighting and heating and cooling systems. EES’s services were designed to help customers reduce their energy costs and improve their energy efficiency.

EES was a huge money loser.

However, under Pai’s leadership, EES grew rapidly, becoming one of the largest providers of energy management services in the United States and booked lots of fake profits. 

Pai

Pai had joined Enron in 1985 and played a key role in building Enron’s energy trading business, which eventually became the company’s most profitable operations. He was known for his aggressive approach to business and for pushing the company to take on more risk.

But, many give credit to Enron’s energy trading profit to their star trader John Arnold and of course the deregulation of California’s energy market. Which allowed Enron traders to artificially pump up prices in California and reap nearly $10 billion in profits. 

Pai left Enron in 2001, just before the company’s collapse, and sold $270 million worth of Enron stock. 

Pai knew many of the profits booked from various Enron subsidiaries, for example the Indian power plant which was actually losing $250k per day and the Blockbuster deal were fake. 

Enron’s power plant in India, known as the Dabhol Power Project, was a large, $3 billion dollar power plant and LNG terminal project located in the Indian state of Maharashtra. The project was a joint venture between Enron, the Maharashtra State Electricity Board (MSEB), and other partners, and was intended to provide much-needed electricity to the region.

The Dabhol Power Project was first proposed in the early 1990s, and construction began in 1995. However, the project was plagued by delays and cost overruns from the start, and was beset by a number of controversies, including allegations of corruption and mismanagement.

One of the main controversies surrounding the project was the high cost of electricity generated by the plant, which was significantly higher than the prevailing market rates. This led to protests by local residents and political opposition, and the project was eventually cancelled in 2001, following Enron’s collapse.

The “Blockbuster” Enron deal refers to a transaction that occurred in 2000, in which Enron and Blockbuster Inc., the then-largest US provider of movie and game rentals by mail and video rental stores created a network to distribute movies. The deal was worth $115 million and was seen as a significant event at the time, as it marked the first time that a non-media company had invested in a major way in the entertainment industry. Of course, it was a complete loser in every way and was eventually cancelled entirely. The technology simply didn’t work. 

Pai’s sudden departure from Enron and the timing of his stock sales were heavily scrutinized in the wake of the company’s collapse. 

He was not charged with any criminal or civil wrongdoing related to Enron’s collapse. However, his actions were criticized and were seen as contributing to the loss of trust in the company and its leadership. To further show the moral strength of Enron’s leadership, Pai left his wife for a local stripper. 

A former Enron employee, interviewed in the 2005 documentary film Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, referred to Pai as “the invisible CEO”.

How was Enron hiding all of these losses?

Enron used a variety of financial structures, known as “special purpose entities” (SPEs), to hide debt and inflate profits. These practices allowed Enron to report artificially high earnings and make the company appear more financially stable than it actually was.

But, Skilling couldn’t put together all of the complicated accounting shenanigans on his own and relied on CFO Fastow to create hundreds of partnerships to hide debt. Partnerships that Fastow acted as Managing Partner of and paid himself an unknown amount of money between $50 and $100m in some estimations. 

Andrew Fastow was the chief financial officer (CFO) of Enron Corporation from 1998 to 2001, a tenure that was marked by controversy and ultimately ended in his conviction for fraud and other financial crimes related to the company’s collapse.

Fastow joined Enron in 1990 and quickly rose through the ranks and become CFO in 1998.

Known for his financial acumen, Fastow played a key role in expanding Enron’s operations into areas such as telecommunications and the internet. However, Fastow’s tenure at Enron is marked by some of the most questionable and shady accounting practices in the history of modern finance, particularly the use of special purpose entities (SPEs) to hide debt and inflate profits.

The SPEs, which were controlled by Fastow and allowed him to reap enormous profits, allowed Enron to report artificially high earnings and make the company appear more financially stable than it actually was. This accounting trickery allowed the top executives to receive large bonuses and inflated the stock price.

These SPE’s were sold to Wall Street banks.

Banks that understood the corrupt nature of the SPE process and 2 Merrill Lynch bankers would serve jail time.

Furthermore, Enron’s accounting firm Arthur Anderson signed off on all of this nefarious activity for about $2million per week in fees. Of course Anderson, which was one of the largest global accounting firms would become disbanded.

Arthur Andersen employees, from left, Michael C. Odom, Nancy Temple, Dorsey Baskin Jr., and C.E. Andrews are sworn in as they appear before a House Committee on January 24, 2002.

In 2001, Skilling was appointed CEO of Enron, taking over from Ken Lay. However, his tenure was short-lived, as he resigned just six months later, citing “personal reasons.” This sudden departure, along with growing concerns about the company’s financial health, led to a loss of investor confidence and a plummeting stock price.

Enron eventually filed for bankruptcy in December 2001.

The scandal surrounding Enron’s collapse led to a number of investigations and legal proceedings, and Fastow was eventually convicted of securities fraud, insider trading, and conspiracy. He agreed to a plea deal with prosecutors and was sentenced to six years in prison and was ordered to forfeit $23.8 million.

Skilling was charged with multiple counts of securities fraud, insider trading, and making false statements to auditors. He was found guilty on 19 counts of securities fraud, conspiracy, and insider trading, and was sentenced to 24 years in prison, and fined $45 million.

His trial and conviction were the result of a prolonged investigation and legal proceedings following the collapse of Enron. Skilling’s defense team argued that he was not aware of the accounting irregularities at the company, but the prosecution argued that he was aware of the company’s financial problems and misled investors and analysts.

Skilling’s sentence was one of the harshest punishments handed down in the wake of the Enron scandal, and was intended to send a message to other corporate executives that such fraudulent activities will not be tolerated. The sentence was later reduced to 14 years in prison on an appeal and he was released in 2019 after serving 12 years in prison.

In addition to his criminal sentence, Skilling was also barred from serving as an officer or director of a publicly traded company. The SEC also barred Skilling from ever again working in the securities industry.

Lay was charged with multiple counts of securities fraud, insider trading, and making false statements to auditors. He was found guilty on all counts, but his conviction was vacated after he died of a heart attack in July 2006. His death came just a few months after his conviction and before his sentencing.

During the trial, Lay’s defense team argued that he was not aware of the accounting irregularities at the company, but the prosecution argued that he was aware of the company’s financial problems and misled investors and analysts. Lay maintained his innocence until his death and his family attempted to clear his name.

In addition to his criminal case, Lay was also sued by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for civil fraud and insider trading. The SEC sought to recover more than $90 million in ill-gotten gains and penalties from Lay, however, the case was dismissed after his death.

John Arnold would go on to start a multi-billion-dollar hedge fund and become a major philanthropist. 

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Business

What Exactly Did Enron Do?