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USS Alaska (CB-1): A History in Pictures

The U.S. Navy large cruiser USS Alaska (CB-1) photographed on 30 July 1944 off the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania (USA). 30 July 1944, Official U.S. Navy photo NH 57214 from the U.S. Navy Naval History and Heritage Command

USS Alaska (CB-1): A History in Pictures Laid down 10 days after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor, the USS Alaska was the lead ship of the Alaska class of large cruisers.

USS Alaska (CB-1) photographed during launching at the New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, New Jersey, on 15 August 1943. 
The U.S. Navy large cruiser USS Alaska (CB-1) maneuvers in front of the battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) during their shakedown cruise, circa August 1944.
The U.S. Navy large cruiser USS Alaska (CB-1) photographed from USS Missouri (BB-63) off the U.S. East Coast during their shakedown cruise together in August 1944. Note her Measure 32 camouflage.
The Navy only built Alaska and one other ship in her class, in addition to the USS Guam. She had 34,253 long tons of displacement along with an 808-foot length.
Aerial view of the U.S. Navy large cruiser USS Alaska (CB-1), in 1945.
Her four-shaft General Electric geared steam turbines and eight oil-fired Babcock & Wilcox boilers generated 150,000 horsepower which pushed her to a maximum speed of 33 knots.
Recognition drawing of the Alaska class U.S. navy. – US Navy Historical Center : http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/usnshtp/cru/cb1cl-d.htm
U.S. Navy Chief Quartermaster John P. Overholt taking a sun sighting with a sextant from the navigating bridge aboard the battlecruiser USS Alaska (CB-1). Taken circa 6 March 1945, during the Iwo Jima operation. Taking notes on the observations is Quartermaster Third Class Clark R. Bartholomew.

Unfortunately, she wasn’t commissioned until June 17th, 1944, so her late entrance to the war limited her tour of duty.

The U.S. Navy large cruiser USS Alaska (CB-1) underway at sea on 13 January 1945, the day she arrived at Pearl Harbor.
USS Alaska (CB-1): Crew of a 40mm quad antiaircraft machine gun mount loading clips into the loaders of the left pair of guns. Taken on 6 March 1945, during the Iwo Jima operation. The man at the right is Seaman Second Class Richard Roberts, and the gun captain (in the phone talker’s helmet) is Gunner’s Mate Second Class Glenn F. Groff.

She would contribute to Iwo Jima and Okinawa and after the war help with the bombardment of Korea.

A U.S. Navy Gunner’s Mate First Class Carrick N. Thomas passing a clip of four 40 mm rounds through a hatch in a 40 mm handling room aboard the battlecruiser USS Alaska (CB-1). Note the green, red, and white color coding on the projectiles, the room’s white paint, and the red battle lamp. Photographed on 6 March 1945 during the Iwo Jima operation.
USS Alaska (CB-1): A detailed view of the forward superstructure and the aircraft catapults, circa 1945.
A U.S. Navy Curtiss SC-1 Seahawk floatplanes taxiing up to the landing mat streamed alongside the battlecruiser USS Alaska (CB-1), to be picked up by the aircraft crane. Photographed on 6 March 1945 during the Iwo Jima operation.
USS Alaska (CB-1) firing 5″/38 guns on 5 February 1945, one day before the ship arrived at Ulithi and joined the fast carrier task force. Note “flak” bursts in the left distance. Removed caption read: Photo # K-3031     Gunnery practice on USS Alaska, 1945
In conclusion, she would be scrapped in 1960 sadly, and not become a museumship for all to see.
The U.S. Navy large cruiser USS Alaska (CB-1) underway on 11 September 1944.
Reserve fleet in Bayonne; the two large ships at right are Alaska and Guam.

USS Alaska (CB-1): A History in Pictures

The U.S. Navy battlecruiser USS Alaska (CB-1) photographed from atop a 127 mm/38 gun mount on the battleship USS Missouri (BB-63) during their shakedown cruise, Summer 1944.