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Physics Nobel Prize Winner Frank Wilczek & Alexander Fleiss on Gravity

Physics Nobel Prize Winner Frank Wilczek & Alexander Fleiss on Gravity.

Frank Wilczek

In 2004, Frank Wilczek won the Nobel Prize for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction. Moreover, a powerful, strong interaction. One that binds together the protons and neutrons that comprise the nucleus, holds together the atomic nucleus.

Early Life

Born in MineolaNew York, Wilczek is of Polish and Italian origin.[1] His grandparents were immigrants, who “really did work with their hands,” according to Wilczek, but Frank’s father took night school classes to educate himself, working as a repairman to support his family.[5] Wilczek’s father became a “self-taught engineer,” whose interests in technology and science inspired his son.[6]

Wilczek received education in the public schools of Queens, attending Martin Van Buren High School. Around this time Wilczek’s parents realized that he was exceptional. In part as a result of Frank Wilczek’s IQ test.

Work

A powerful, strong interaction holds together the atomic nucleus. One that binds together the protons and neutrons that comprise the nucleus. Furthermore, the strong interaction also holds together the quarks that make up protons and neutrons. This interaction is so strong that no scientist has ever observed a free quarks.

However, in 1973 Frank Wilczek, David Gross, and David Politzer came up with a theory postulating:

That when quarks come really close to one another, the attraction abates and they behave like free particles.

This is asymptotic freedom!

Asymptotic Freedom

In particle physics, asymptotic freedom is a property of some gauge theories. Moreover, one that causes interactions between particles to become asymptotically weaker. As a result of the energy scale increasing and the corresponding length scale decreases.

In conclusion, we would like to thank Frank for his gracious participation.

Physics Nobel Prize Winner Frank Wilczek & Alexander Fleiss on Gravity.