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Trump Opens US Skies to Drones

· Drone,Regulation,Automation,Delivery,Logistics

Trump Opens US Skies to Drones

According to The Economist, the number of consumer drones in flight over the continental United States will hit 2.8 million. This number is expected to climb to about 3.5 million by the year 2021. These highly advanced hovercrafts can be used for pleasure, maintenance, search and rescue, and scientific discoveries. However, the total potential for these little worker bees is practically limitless. One of the most debated topics over use of drones is their potential takeover of the delivery business. Rebellion covered the potential for drones delivering pizzas in Do You Tip a Robot?

Larges companies such as Amazon and Google have been pursuing the usage of drones to deliver packages, but these efforts have been stonewalled by the FAA’s (Federal Aviation Administration) safety and privacy limitations. However, on Monday, the Trump Administration set forth a proposal to allow drones to fly over heavily populated areas and at night, two factors which have halted drone delivery efforts in the past.

Logistically, these new proposals have certain conditions for drones that must be met. The drone must be equipped with proper lighting and have a maximum weight of 0.55 pounds. Any drone heavier than 0.55 pounds must be equipped with injury proof contraptions that will prevent harm to humans if drones were to crash and fall. Additionally, the drone operator would need night time training and testing in order to be deemed eligible to fly these aircrafts.

The proposal will be published soon in the federal register and have a 60-day comment period. If passed, the proposal will quite possibly revolutionize the way the delivery business operates and completely transform the way we receive packages.

Written by Matthew Durborow & Edited by Alexander Fleiss

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